Text Size
A A A



 



Release Date:
 
You can use any combination of filters to list publications by key word, publication type, author, legal domain, concern and release date range.




Election Survey - Commonwealth 2014 - Q10


Q10 - Vilification legislation

Laws that prohibit vilification on the grounds of religious belief or sexuality are an unwarranted interference with free speech and religious liberty. Those who point out the health risks of homosexual behaviour or who question claims and practices of a particular religion, such as Islam, should not be penalised. Australians are already adequately protected by sedition laws, which prohibit incitement to use force or violence against others that would threaten the peace, order and good government of the Commonwealth.

Would you vote against any attempt to introduce a "vilification" law that would penalise frank discussion and debate of religious belief or sexuality?

Party Reply Score
Australian Labor Party 

Federal Labor has been progressing a comprehensive, consolidated anti-discrimination legislation, titled the Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Bill. The Bill was released for community comment and a Senate Committee inquiry in November last year, and the Government welcomed the robust public debate that occurred.

As part of this process, the then Attorney-General removed paragraph 19(2)(b) which incorporated behaviour which offends or insults another in the definition of discrimination from the draft, on the basis that it could impact on freedom of expression. The Attorney-General has asked the Department to consider this issue, and a re-elected Labor Government will consider this advice as well as the proposals put forward by all submissions on the draft Bill, before it finalises the consolidation Bill.

 3
Liberal National Coalition

The Coalition is committed to protecting the right of all people to practise their religion without intimidation or harassment, as long as those practices are within the framework of Australian law.

We are concerned that section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, which prohibits statements that "offend, insult or humiliate" another person or a group of people on grounds of race or ethnicity, is a threat to free speech in Australia.

Offending, insulting, humiliating or intimidating others on any grounds, racial or otherwise, is deplorable. It should be everyone's goal to elevate the standards of public debate, not lower them, and to demonstrate respect rather than disdain for the various components of our community. Still, a "hurt feelings" test is impossible to comply with while maintaining the fearless pursuit of truth, which should be the hallmark of a society such as ours. Speech that has to be inoffensive would be unerringly politically correct but it would not be free.

The Coalition will repeal section 18C in its current form. Any prohibitions on inciting hatred against or intimidation of particular racial groups should be akin to the ancient common law offences of incitement and causing fear.

We do not propose that the definition of 'discrimination' in section 3 of the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 be altered.

The Coalition respects the rights of religious organisations to uphold their own beliefs in their employment practices.

 10
The Greens

Definitely not.
 2
Non-Custodial Parents Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Rise Up Australia Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Democratic Labour Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
 Liberal Democratic Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Outdoor Recreation Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Family First Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Australian Christians Party 

Yes definitely.
 10
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party 

No comment.
 1
Australian Voice 

No comment.
 1
Katter's Australian Party

Yes definitely.
 10
Palmer United Party 

No comment.
 1

Authorised by: David Phillips, FamilyVoice Australia, 4th Floor, 68 Grenfell St, Adelaide SA 5000




 


Subscribe or renew
subscription



Give now




S M T W T F S
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30